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You don't have to look like this guy to successfully cut your own Christmas Tree. Whether you're hitting the woods around home or heading to the local tree farm, there are some key items that will make easy work of cutting your own tree, which is sure to become an annual Chaconian tradition.

Fill a thermos with your favorite warm drink, spiked or not, and bring it along. One of our favorites is Spiced Apple Cider:

  • 32 whole allspice berries
  • 24 cinnamon sticks
  • 24 cardamom pods
  • 12 whole cloves
  • 12 strips (2 inches wide) orange zest (from about 3 oranges)
  • 1 gallon apple cider
Combine all ingredients in a pot. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, and cook until fragrant, about 5 minutes. Cider can be kept warm over very low heat. Strain before serving, reserving cinnamon sticks for garnish if desired.

A good pair of work gloves, with insulation if it's chilly where you are, will help protect your hands from scrapes, cuts and worst of all... sap. High amounts of sap in live Christmas trees give these holiday staples their signature aroma. The sticky resin can also be quite the hassle once it's on your hands... and then clothes.

Use a small to medium sized hand saw or pruning saw, rather than an axe, to cut your tree. They're safer, especially when your hands are cold, and much easier to use. They also allow the cut to be much straighter and flat, which will keep the tree healthy in your home for longer.

 

Pack a tarp to protect the roof of your car or truck bed from the tree when transporting it home. Fold the tarp and position it under the tree before securing it to your car.

 

 

 

Good footwear, like the Chaco Dundas Waterproof Boot and the Belyn Baa, is essential when chopping your Christmas tree. Keeping feet warm, dry and comfortable is key to enjoying any time outside during the colder months. A lugged sole lends traction on slippery terrain while selecting, sawing and lugging your tree.

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